issueprojectroom:

A preview of forthcoming debut LPs by Sergei Tcherepnin and Sabisha Friedberg as part of our new Distributed Objects publishing imprint. 

With 4 days remaining, ISSUE has now raised 62% of our fundraising goal towards production funds for these releases. 

Some exciting new incentives have been added to our fundraising campaign, including a limited number of All-Access and Collector-level Memberships as well as invitations to exclusive private performances by Artists-in-Residence Peter Evans and Moriah Evans! Other rewards include new ISSUE totes, limited edition cassettes, silkscreen posters, and more.

We need your support! Please consider pledging to our Kickstarter Campaign to receive discounted copies of these LPs and provide critical funds for the launch of Distributed Objects. In the coming years, this important imprint will release new and historical recordings and texts by an array of innovative artists.

  • Pledge $10 for a digital download
  • Pledge $25 for either Tcherepnin or Friedberg’s 2xLP
  • Pledge $45 for both Tcherepnin & Friedberg’s records

Tahrir is everywhere, Tokyo is Fukushima, and this civilization’s truth producers have delivered it a terminal diagnosis. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the new geological era in which Man has been named prime mover and prime calamity, standing atop the growing pile of wreckage and able only to imagine an apocalyptic future with no hope of redemption. 

In this threshold age, an undeclared state of war exists whose parameters come not from politics but ethics, not from the intellect but from life. What matters now is not announcing the catastrophe (everyone knows), but the sense we give to it, and how we lend force to emerging sensibilities and forms of life.

1882 Woodbine Street is a workshop, discussion space, and garden in Ridgewood, New York. One piece in a global constellation, it is a post-Sandy and post-Occupy experiment in collective research and organization. 
On Fridays, it is a cafe.

Notes on the Anthropocene:
"What Must I Do?" at the End of the World

Stephanie Wakefield, 1882 Woodbine

Talk
Tonight, May 16, 7pm

http://artistsspace.org/programs/notes-on-the-anthropocene

mgadis:

Sam Pulitzer
A Colony 
for “Them”
March 16 –
May 18, 2014

Opening 
Saturday, March 15, 6 - 8pm

Open Monday, May 12 during Frieze New York

Artists Space Exhibitions
38 Greene Street
3rd Floor

With contributions by Matthew Adis, Joshua Brettel, Killian Eng, Simon Fowler, Bill Hayden, Denis Forkas Kostromitin, 
Ola Larsson, Jeff Nagy, Sam Pulitzer, Steven Vallot, Viral Graphics, and 
Vania Zouravliov

phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC

rachelcrummeyrachelcrummey:

One of the best shows I saw in NYC: Macho Man Tell it To My Heart (from the collection of Julie Ault)

“I’m a believer in luck and think the social conditions you’re born into provide the opportunity for you to prove your luck. And I suppose I’ve been lucky.”
Sigmar Polke  (via artnet)
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on

It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.

Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.

And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.

Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times