Tahrir is everywhere, Tokyo is Fukushima, and this civilization’s truth producers have delivered it a terminal diagnosis. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the new geological era in which Man has been named prime mover and prime calamity, standing atop the growing pile of wreckage and able only to imagine an apocalyptic future with no hope of redemption. 

In this threshold age, an undeclared state of war exists whose parameters come not from politics but ethics, not from the intellect but from life. What matters now is not announcing the catastrophe (everyone knows), but the sense we give to it, and how we lend force to emerging sensibilities and forms of life.

1882 Woodbine Street is a workshop, discussion space, and garden in Ridgewood, New York. One piece in a global constellation, it is a post-Sandy and post-Occupy experiment in collective research and organization. 
On Fridays, it is a cafe.

Notes on the Anthropocene:
"What Must I Do?" at the End of the World

Stephanie Wakefield, 1882 Woodbine

Talk
Tonight, May 16, 7pm

http://artistsspace.org/programs/notes-on-the-anthropocene

mgadis:

Sam Pulitzer
A Colony 
for “Them”
March 16 –
May 18, 2014

Opening 
Saturday, March 15, 6 - 8pm

Open Monday, May 12 during Frieze New York

Artists Space Exhibitions
38 Greene Street
3rd Floor

With contributions by Matthew Adis, Joshua Brettel, Killian Eng, Simon Fowler, Bill Hayden, Denis Forkas Kostromitin, 
Ola Larsson, Jeff Nagy, Sam Pulitzer, Steven Vallot, Viral Graphics, and 
Vania Zouravliov

phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC phillyartblog:

Macho Man, Tell It To My Heart at Artists Space gallery in SoHo, NYC

rachelcrummeyrachelcrummey:

One of the best shows I saw in NYC: Macho Man Tell it To My Heart (from the collection of Julie Ault)

“I’m a believer in luck and think the social conditions you’re born into provide the opportunity for you to prove your luck. And I suppose I’ve been lucky.”
Sigmar Polke  (via artnet)
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times
latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on
It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.
Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.
And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.
Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

California’s calamitous drought drags on

It’s dry in California - historically dry. Water is in short supply, the air is noticeably without moisture, farms are parched and just look at the photo above of the state’s dwindling snow cover. It pretty much speaks for itself.

Meanwhile, various interests are turning to the political realm to try and ensure they get theirs when it comes to H2O.

And the drought has been particularly harsh on agriculture:

Ranchers have begun liquidating herds. Growers are considering tearing out thirsty tree crops such as nut orchards and citrus groves. And tens of thousands of additional acres of prime California soil could go unplanted if farmers don’t get enough water to irrigate them.

Read more on the drought’s effect on California here.

Photos: David McNew / Getty Images, Frederic J. Brown / Associated Press, NOAA, Randall Benton / Los Angeles Times

nprfreshair:

Pussy Riot members Maria Alyokhina (left) and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were on the Colbert Report last night. Watch the interview here (in two parts). They share their views on Vladimir Putin’s anti-gay laws as well as their global campaign for better prison conditions.

Side note: Imagine the task of translating Stephen Colbert into Russian…

A little while back we spoke to Russian journalist Masha Gessen, author of the book Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot, about these issues. Here Gessen tells us about the conditions Tolokonnikova was subjected to:

"What had happened at her penal colony was that the sewing factory that has served as the lifeblood of every women’s penitentiary institution in Russia, and many of the men’s ones, was taking on more and more orders, so the inmates were forced to work longer and longer hours. By the end of the summer, the workday was about 17 hours, so they were allowed to sleep about four hours a night, if that. They wouldn’t get days off except maybe every six weeks or so. So they were incredibly sleep deprived. The working conditions were very unsafe and they were also … fed very, very poorly in the prison colony.

So Nadezhda decided to protest first inside the prison by going to complain to the warden and saying that they needed to return the workday to the legal limit of eight hours. In response, he threatened her with murder.”

Gessen’s interview also touches on the upcoming Sochi Olympics. Check it out.

(via npr)